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The three drinks our 2020 interviewees couldn’t be without

This year we interviewed some fantastic women in the wine trade. To celebrate the festive season we asked them to name three drinks they couldn’t do without this Christmas. Unsurprisingly, there are some real corkers!

Clara Latham, General Manager at Della Vite

Della Vite Prosecco Superiore DOCG

I’ve chosen a Prosecco as my sparking for the festive season, because its light – making it perfect as an aperitif to kick off an evening. Della Vite’s Superiore specifically I find to be less sweet compared with others, really balanced in taste and crisp in texture.

Chenin Blanc – Coulee de Serrant, Loire Valley – Savennieres, 2013

I fell in love with this wine whilst celebrating my partners birthday at the Pig Hotel in Bath – some of the younger vintages are easier to get hold of and are still fantastic. A natural wine with real minerality – always a special treat.

Barolo DOCG Villadoria, Piemonte, 2015

Full bodied, and perfect to accompany cosy dinners with open fires – bang on for delicious wintery moments.

Melanie Jappy 2.4.19
Photo © SBurnett

Melanie Jappy, Producer of The Wine Show and founder, TWS Creative

Belsazar Rosé Vermouth with tonic

This is a German vermouth and it’s a lovely light apero that still feels like a drink but doesn’t get you too squiffy while you’re stirring the bread sauce. I’m not a champagne girl (although I can be persuaded if it’s vintage!) so for me a vermouth and tonic is a perfect way to open the festivities.

Quinta da Boa Esperança Syrah 2016

For the last couple of years my life has been dominated by Portugal – filming there, socialising there and certainly making friends there. So I’ll be opening a bottle of  Quinta da Boa Esperança Syrah 2016 on Christmas Day. It’s going to be an intimate lunch so I’m cooking a Challans Duck with persimmon and I think it can take the magnificent Syrah they produce which, with candlelight and some gentle music will let me snooze away to dream of those dusty hot summer days in Portugal. The owner of the winery, Artur Gamma has become a great friend and I’m a huge fan of all the wines from the Quinta, but this one leaves me swooning every time.

Grahams 20 year old Tawny

I’ve also fallen back in love with Port unsurprisingly. We’d been on hiatus from each other after an unfortunate encounter at a University Dining Club in the early 1990s. But having found each other again, the relationship has found a solid footing. I adore vintage, but as there won’t be many around the table, I think I’ll go with Grahams 20 year old Tawny which we can enjoy over a few nights. Not only is it a great wine, but it also takes me back to one of my favourite day’s filming ever high above the Douro River when we ate Pizza out of an old fig drying oven and drank chilled Tawny with Charlotte and Rob Symington and Olga Martins and Jorge Moreira. It really was a day I’ll never forget. Everything you hope the wine world will be…full of laughter, friendship and warmth.

Thank goodness for headphones! Clare shares her desk with her three homeschooling children.

Clare Malec, Founder and Director of Island Media

A Bloody Mary with Sapling Vodka and Pickle House Spiced Tomato Mix

The mixture of spiciness and warmth from a really well made bloody mary is the perfect antidote to a bracing walk in the cold at this time of year.  Keen to support innovative British businesses I have just discovered the two perfect ingredients – Sapling Vodka produced in London using local ingredients with very green credentials (they plant a tree for every bottle bought).  Mix this with Suffolk produced Pickle House Spiced Tomato Mix, generous in its spiciness, and you are already well on the path to feeling the Christmas warmth and cheer.

Ashling Park Cuvée

Christmas is time also time for celebratory fizz and again I will be looking close to home for the right bottle.  We have so many incredible wineries on our doorstep wherever we are in this country but one of my favourites is Ashling Park Cuvée from the foot of the South Downs in West Sussex.  Their talented team won two of the top awards at this year’s Wine GB Awards and its not difficult to see why.

Anything South African!

Looking further afield 2020 has been the beginning of my love affair with South African wine. I feel I have only just started on my voyage of discovery, so have filled our wine rack with a mixture of reds and whites from a host of different producers. They present amazing value for money and the diversity of styles and flavours means that whatever we are eating, it is not difficult to find something interesting to pair with it.

Collette O’Leary, Winemaker at Henners Vineyard

Henners Brut NV

Of course! I may be biased but this is the perfect fizz for celebrations large and small this season.  It’s the wine I will give friends and family, as well as enjoy myself.

Domaine Berthelemot Puligny-Montrachet

A treat for Christmas, ripe fruit, acidity and lovely oak balance gives it a delicious richness to match with food at Christmas.

Domaine Boutinot Le Six

For me this is a perfect all-rounder, soft, velvety Rhone blend, fruit driven and just so appealing.

A little extra…

And an espresso martini….because when is that ever a bad idea?!

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Interview: Clara Latham

Swirl meets Clara Latham, General Manager of Della Vite.

Working with Seedlip, Clara created a whole new category of drink. It was called ‘the emperor’s new clothes’ – but today Seedlip is the king of the ever-growing distilled non-alcoholic spirit category. Now with recently launched Della Vita, can Clara change how we view Prosecco too?

What’s it like to create a category?

Establishing a normal brand – you know who your competitors are, the category and concept are established and the trade understands what you’re doing. They know what to expect from your product. But when you are creating a whole new category you can’t look at the world as it currently is – because otherwise you don’t exist. You have to look at the world as you think it could be.

Before Seedlip, if you weren’t drinking for whatever reason, your options were really limited. People expected to feel disappointed. Taking that as our starting point, Seedlip created something that made people feel good, irregardless of whether they were drinking alcohol or not, they felt considered. We have an opportunity to change the way things are today and to do that for the better. That’s endlessly inspiring.

How are you seeing the that the world could be different with Della Vite?

Though Della Vite is a very different proposition from Seedlip, I felt that they had lots of parallels. I felt a bit nervous to lead with the word ‘Prosecco’ when people asked me what my new venture was. Their faces would drop. ‘Really?’ they’d say, ‘not English sparkling? Not a category that’s on the rise?’.

But when I look at the Prosecco category as it stands in Great Britain, I see a massive opportunity to reposition it and change how it’s perceived. At the moment it’s seen as an entry-level cheap commodity, I think mainly because the large proportion of Prosecco which reaches us here is mass market and mass produced. But we have an opportunity to get people understanding that there is such a thing as really high-quality Prosecco – that they could be feel proud not just to say that they drink it, but that they even prefer it. That it’s their chosen drink.

Compared with other celebrity wines, there’s an unexpected focus on technical detail with Della Vite. What’s the motivation for that? And what challenges did you experience working with both Prosecco and celebrities – two things the established trade aren’t overly fond of?

It’s not just a beautifully designed bottle with the name of some celebrity sisters slapped on the bottle. Della Vite aspires to be a category pioneer – and we can only do that with a really well-crafted product. The most important factor for me taking this role was connecting with the sisters and understanding that they didn’t just want to launch another celebrity wine.

Della Vite is quite a different thing. It’s not just another premium rosé with a celebrity endorsement that does well in a category which people already understand and appreciate. The premiumisation of prosecco hasn’t happened yet – but Della Vite is more than up to the challenge. And it’s backed by these sisters who really understand that Prosecco can be a premium product and who know what they’re talking about – and who are prepared to surround themselves with people who give their ambition the best chance of succeeding.

Of course, people are always resistant to change. It’s natural to meet resistance when you’re doing something that’s not been done before. That’s why we really own the importance of education.

When you were marketing Seedlip what did you learn about the alcohol sector? And now you’re marketing alcohol, what can you apply from your experience with Seedlip?

Seedlip was a steep learning curve. Being in and around the alcoholic trade you suddenly realise in order to win in the on-trade the trade play a gate-keeper role in that. They’re the people who display your product to the consumer. Gaining their respect and investing time in getting them onside was really important.

But I also think the naivety can be an asset. Not being blinkered by what’s expected means you can approach things in a fresh way in a very ‘challenger’ way. Part of behaving like that gets people very interested and excited by what you’re doing.

I have also learnt the difference between the ‘wine trade’ and the ‘alcoholic brand world’ and their two schools of thought, for example when speaking to the wine trade, a heavy focus is on the product and liquid credentials. I describe Della Vite as being the perfect brand sitting between the two ways of thinking. We can lean into our wine credentials, and have a technical, intellectual conversation about the wine, and then we can also lean into the fact that we’re bubbles, we’re contemporary and that we have incredible lifestyle credentials. There’s a common ground for everyone.

What are you ambitions for Della Vite?

For me, success wouldn’t only be measured by how many bottles we sold, but alongside this, whether we’d become the brand which opened the door to a new space for Prosecco which was more celebrated, higher quality, and better understood.

Really, I’d love people to recognise that our brand was part of that step change.

Think of Fevertree – they did something fantastic for tonic. Before Sipsmiths and Hendricks gin was just Gordons. They managed to change people’s perception of what the norm was for that particular category. I hope that Della Vite will do the same.

Interview: Melanie Jappy

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Japanese wine’s big moment

Earlier this year, a panel of industry experts gathered in London to assess over 100 Japanese wines. Analysing style, flavour profile, packaging and positioning of each wine in the market, the panel’s aim was to help Japan’s small but blossoming wine industry with targeted advice for each producer on how to develop their sales in the UK market.  This is a key part of what […]